Get 1 million signatures to Congress, sign the Employee Free Choice Act petition

Corporate interests are fighting the Employee Free Choice Act with everything they've got. They're protecting the status quo – a rigged system which allows employers to intimidate, harass, and even fire workers who try to form a union. We're not talking about isolated incidents:
30 percent of employers fire pro-union workers during union organizing drives.
1

Added this gem to the top right of the page as the combustible dust petition is reaching it's 500th. signature(please sign it if you haven't already done so). Now it's time to tell Congress we are serious about the Employee Free Choice Act. So from todays E-Mail box.

Dear Joseph,

CEOs take in millions while the economy tanks – and workers pay the price.

One Million Strong for the Employee Free Choice Act

The Employee Free Choice Act can get us back on track. Click here to sign the petition.

A robust middle class. Economic growth and shared prosperity. The American Dream. None are possible without good union jobs that protect workers.

That's why we need the Employee Free Choice Act – critical legislation that would give more workers a way to form unions and negotiate for better wages, health care, and working conditions.

We're teaming up with hundreds of groups and unions to launch a massive campaign: One Million Strong for the Employee Free Choice Act.

We're going to show the new President and Congress that there are one million people who want to give hardworking families a chance to get ahead. Can you be one of the first?

Click here to sign the petition for the Employee Free Choice Act.

Why is this bill so important? It's plain as day: workers are struggling in this country.

Today's workplaces are tilted in favor of lavishly-paid CEOs, who get golden parachutes while middle-class families struggle to get by. The Employee Free Choice Act can restore the balance, giving more workers a chance to form unions and get better health care, job security, and benefits – and an opportunity to pursue their dreams.

Corporate interests are fighting the Employee Free Choice Act with everything they've got. They're protecting the status quo – a rigged system which allows employers to intimidate, harass, and even fire workers who try to form a union. We're not talking about isolated incidents: 30 percent of employers fire pro-union workers during union organizing drives.1

It's time our economy worked for everyone again. It's time for Congress to pass the Employee Free Choice Act.

Sign your name to the petition and add your voice to this growing movement. Help us meet our goal of one million signatures!

When you sign, be sure to upload your picture, too. We'll share it with lawmakers so they can see the faces of everyone who cares about this issue.

Together, we can change the law, change the economy, and change our futures for the better.

Sincerely,

Liz Cattaneo
American Rights at Work
www.AmericanRightsatWork.org

P.S. For more information about the Employee Free Choice Act, click here to find out about our campaign.

1 Chirag Mehta and Nik Theodore, Undermining the Right to Organize: Employer Behavior During Union Representation Campaigns, Center for Urban Economic Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Dec. 2005.


The union avoidance law firm Jackson and Lewis has released a press release against the Employee Free Choice Act, Forbes is writing about the corporate fear and the Rick Berman Law group has been putting anti-union/anti-Employee Free Choice Act commercials on the air. They see the writing on the wall. Americans are sick of getting shit on and want to be union workers.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thanks for choosing to comment, your comment is subject to moderation and will appear when I am on the web. No personal attacks please. Junk posts by what I deem as a internet troll will simply be deleted.
All views are welcome, please post links, if any, that have to do with the story, as this will help myself and other readers to follow for more information. Thanks, Joe